CONICAL 3SQUARE, 2011: Beth Arnold, Brooke Shanti Fenner, Therese Keogh, Mentor: Terri Bird Beth Arnold,  Untitled , 2011, Installation consisting of four digital prints, four plaster casts, plywood, pine, dimensions variable.  Photo credits: Beth Arnold and Emil Toonen   
       
     
 Beth Arnold,  Approaching site , 2011.  Plaster, wax, timber, inkjet prints, cement and hand bound books, dimensions variable. Sutton Gallery Project Space, Melbourne.  Photo credit 1 -7: Danica Chappell.  All other photos by Beth Arnold.
       
     
 Beth Arnold,  Cloudform , 2014, mixed media, dimensions variable. Exhibited the McClelland Survey and Award 2014, 23 November 2014 - 19July 2015.  Photo 2 & 4 credit: Mark Ashkanasy  All other photos by Beth Arnold.
       
     
 Beth Arnold,  Lemon tree , 2014.  Part of the Sculpture Trail Category, Lorne Sculpture Biennale, 2014. Dates: 8th March 2014 - 30th March 2014.  All photos by Beth Arnold
       
     
 Beth Arnold,  Untitled , 2012.  Installation consisting of plaster, pigment, timber and found wood, dimensions variable. Produced during residency at Kaus Australis, Rotterdam, Netherlands.  All photos by Beth Arnold
       
     
 Work produced during time as Artist in Residence: School of Visual and Performing Arts, Inveresk, University of Tasmania, Australia, 2012.
       
     
 2008 Intrude: Art & Life, Shanghai Zendai Museum of Modern Art, China.  Beth Arnold,  Imprint , plasticine, dimensions variable, 2008.  All photos by Beth Arnold
       
     
 Beth Arnold,  Keep in Time , 2016.  Test Sites commissioned project, City of Melbourne, timber, steel, kinetic element, string, dimensions variable.  Date: 5th September 2016.  Location: Footpath outside 288 Exhibition Street.  All photos by Christo Crocker.  "Through this project I am interested in creating an artwork that sits playfully amongst the hustle and bustle of the city. 'Keep in time' is a performative sculpture activated through movement. Comprising of three structures, each with a tensioned arch, the sculptures start to bob up and down whenever movement is detected, such as a pedestrian walking by or a car and tram passing. Similar to the constant ‘bobbing’ style of early Walt Disney cartoons, the sculptures perform with a wobble and visual rhythm. This movement is achieved by the timber arch moving in and out of distortion. In this sense the sculpture is active and responsive to it's environment. I aim to reflect the city’s humming rhythm and flow in a playful and humorous way."    - Beth Arnold 2016